How L.A.’s museum district is rebuilding.

Terra-Petra is proud to be part of the 5411 Wilshire, a planned $400 million apartment and retail complex at 5411 Wilshire Blvd. in the historical Miracle Mile district of Los Angeles, led by Walter N. Marks Inc. (developer) and Keating Architecture.  A recent Los Angeles article covers the exciting and much needed changes along the famous Wilshire Blvd. supporting the immediate community and the 5411 Wilshire project.

L.A.’s museum district is rebuilding. But they’re ignoring pedestrians (again)

However, we are not certain  about how the changes will affect pedestrians in a negative way. In fact the changes we have taken part in will only benefit those who visit or frequent the Miracle Mile!

Mapping the long history of oil drilling in Los Angeles

Re-Post of original article on Curbed Los Angeles

Los Angeles has had always had a complicated relationship with oil. In 1892, what had been a small agricultural city popular with Midwestern tourists became a boomtown nearly overnight when oil was discovered in modern-day Echo Park.

From the beginning, the needs of the oil drillers collided with those of residents, visitors, and developers. The city we know today grew up alongside the oil industry and continues to be shaped by it—about 3,000 active wells remain in LA County, many of them in close proximity to residential neighborhoods, parks, and schools.

LA Curbed mapped a few of the places that show how the industry has embedded itself into the urban environment of Los Angeles.

Learn more about Terra-Petra’s Oil Field Services.

1. Echo Park Deep Pool

1419 Colton St
Los Angeles, CA 90026
(213) 481-2640

Visit Website

Here’s where it all began—yes, here. The current site of the Echo Park Deep Pool is where Edward Doheny and his partner Charles Canfield drilled the first oil well in Los Angeles in 1892, using a sharpened eucalyptus tree. According to lore, they found the site after Doheny spotted a slick black substance on the wheel of a passing cart. As casually as possible, he asked the driver to show him exactly where he had come from.

2. Discovery Well Park

2200 Temple Ave
Signal Hill, CA 90755
(562) 989-7330

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A plaque and adjoining park commemorate the first productive well drilled at Signal Hill. On June 23rd, 1921, a geyser of oil erupted from the Alamitos number one well, leading to an explosion of drilling in the Long Beach area. By 1923, Signal Hill was the state’s largest field, and California was producing a quarter of the world’s supply of oil. Per the plaque, the monument is a “tribute to the petroleum pioneers for their success here, a success which has, by aiding in the growth and expansion of the petroleum industry, contributed so much to the welfare of mankind.” We’ll take their word for it.

3. Pico Canyon Oil Field

Doheny may have set off the oil boom within the city of Los Angeles, but the first successful well in LA County was to the north, in the Santa Susana Mountains. A gusher at Charles Mentry’s Pico Well No. 4 on September 26, 1876, announced to the world that Southern California was rich in black gold. The nearby town of Newhall later became home to the state’s first refinery (pictured below).

4. Phillips 66 Oil Refinery

1660 W Anaheim St
Wilmington, CA 90744

The massive Wilmington Oil Field is the largest in California, having produced somewhere between 760 million and 1.2 trillion barrels of oil since it was first tapped in 1932. The Phillips 66 refinery in the southeast Los Angeles neighborhood paints one of its massive storage tanks orange  every October as a strange and festive Halloween tradition.

5. Andeavor Refinery

22600 S Wilmington Ave
Carson, CA 90745
(310) 816-8100

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Perhaps the most recognizable oil facility in the world, the Andeavor Refinery in Carson is adorned with an enormous American flag easily visible to drivers on the 405. Like Andeavor’s Wilmington refinery, this one dates back to the region’s oil boom of the 1920s and 1930s. Together, the two facilities now process a combined 380,000 barrels daily.

6. THUMS Islands

(562) 786-2385

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At the southeastern end of the Wilmington field is are the THUMS islands, constructed by the Texaco, Humble, Union, Mobil and Shell oil companies in 1965. As part of an agreement with the city of Long Beach, the oil companies invested considerable funds in disguising the drilling sites with boulders, palm trees, sculptures, and water falls—so much so that they are sometimes mistaken for luxury resorts.

7. Venice Beach

Venice Beach
Los Angeles, CA

Starting in the 1930s, Venice had a run as one of the leading oil producers in the state. During that time, derricks ran all along the canals and dotted the beach. Waterways became filled with oily sludge and the ocean was badly polluted. Production eventually dropped off in the 1970s and the last wells in the area were capped less than two decades later.

8. Inglewood Oil Field

College Blvd
Culver City, CA 90230

The enormous Inglewood Oil Field was first tapped in 1924 and has produced close to 400 million barrels of oil since then. Despite years of complaints from nearby residents, hundreds of wells continue to operate daily right alongside its neighbors in Baldwin Hills and Culver City.

9. False building

1351 S Genesee Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90019

From the outside this edifice looks like a particularly soul crushing office building with no windows. Inside, however, it’s not a building at all. The structure is simply a shell disguising the site of an oil derrick slurping away at the Beverly Hills Oil Field.

10. Beverly Hills High School

241 S Moreno Dr
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
(310) 229-3685

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One of the smaller major oil fields in the Los Angeles area, the Beverly Hills field is nonetheless productive, and the oil derrick on the campus of Beverly Hills High School was, until recently, churning out about 400 barrels of crude each day. The drilling site was ordered shut in 2016 and the complicated process of cleaning it up is scheduled to start this month.

11. Salt Lake Oil Field

6298 W 3rd St
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 936-2864

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The Grove and Original Farmers Market today sit atop the Salt Lake Oil Field, discovered by dairy farmer Arthur Gilmore in the mid-1890s. Though the field was most productive in the early 20th Century, it was still being tapped in 1985, when drillers inadvertently caused methane gas to move below ground, rising up to the surface within the Ross store at Third Street and Fairfax Avenue. The resulting explosion injured 23 people.

12. Jefferson Drill Site

1375 W Jefferson Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90007

The subject of significant community opposition, this South LA drill site was forced last year to comply with city-imposed requirements that ensure its operators enclose the site and monitor vibrations and noxious fumes that neighbors say are caused by the drilling.

13. Del Amo Field

It might not look like it, but this quiet residential street in Torrance was the site of the first major strike in the Del Amo oil field. Throughout the 1920s, this was one of the most productive fields in the LA area with nearly 1,500 wells spread across more than 3,500 acres.

14. Huntington Beach

Offshore oil rigs are a familiar sight to Huntington Beach residents and visitors. On and off land, drillers have been tapping the city’s oil field since the 1920s. Recent research from the U.S. Geological Survey suggests that it may, in fact, have been oil drilling here that triggered the Long Beach Earthquake in 1933.

Read the original article on Curbed Los Angeles

2018 CALIFORNIA LAND RECYCLING CONFERENCE = Terra-Petra Brownfield Services

Terra-Petra to Sponsor of CA Brownfields Conference | Carson, California

2018 CALIFORNIA LAND RECYCLING CONFERENCE

Presented by Center for Creative Land Recycling, CA Department of Toxic Substances Control, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9

October 24th & 25th, 2018
at the Carson Event Center:   801 East Carson Street, Carson, California
CA Brownfield Conference

CCLR, DTSC and US EPA will present an intensive two-day redevelopment workshop geared towards the unique characteristics of redevelopment in California.

JUST ANNOUNCED!  DTSC will provide an overview of its upcoming Vapor Intrusion (VI) guidance updates at the California Land Recycling Conference.  Be part of the conversation as DTSC VI experts and authors/contributors discuss the guidance publicly for the first time to a brownfields-focused audience.

Learn more at:   https://www.cclr.org/california-land-recycling-conference-2018

Those attending this year may get in touch with us prior to the conference to arrange for a face-to-face meeting time.

Contact us via email here   or call the main Los Angeles office to speak with Justin Conaway:    213.458.0494.

Learn more about Terra-Petra’s Brownfield Services.

TERRA-PETRA SPONSORS CLA ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CONFERENCE AT YOSEMITE

Terra-Petra Sponsors 27th Annual Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite®

The Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite® is presented annually by the California Lawyers Association (CLA) and is held at Tenaya Lodge At Yosemite, Thursday-Sunday, October 18-21, 2018.

The Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite® is nationally recognized as the largest and most prestigious gathering in California of leaders in environmental, land use, and natural resources law. Many of the nation’s top environmental officials, lawyers, and other professionals will be at this well attended conference in the spectacular setting of Yosemite.

Read more about schedule, program, etc. here.

Here are some highlights from this year’s conference.

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Terra-Petra Sponsors Bar Association of San Francisco Environmental Law Section Event

Terra-Petra was a proud sponsor of The Bar Association of San Francisco Environmental Law Section event, “Meet Your Environmental Regulators” on October 4, 2018.

The Annual Members Reception provided construction industry professionals with the opportunity to meet with representatives of many important environmental regulatory agencies, including:

California Department of Toxic Substances Control
California Coastal Commission
Bay Area Air Quality Management District
San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission
California Attorney General’s Office
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
Bay Area County Local Oversight Programs
U. S. Department of Justice
Regional Water Quality Control Board
Native American Heritage Commission

http://static.ow.ly/docs/G182908-3_7YWy.pdf

 

Terra-Petra consults on newest LA Multifamily Developments to Implement Tetris-Style Parking System

Two new multifamily developments in Los Angeles are getting a unique Tetris-style semi-automated parking system that could lead to a shift in how residents park their vehicles. In late summer 2018, Beverly Hills-based Markwood Enterprises broke ground on a 14-unit, 16K SF multifamily property in mid-Wilshire and a 13-unit, 12K SF multifamily development in Larchmont. Each offers one unit for very-low-income tenants.

Terra-Petra provided environmental consulting pre- and during the ground breaking as well as waterproofing consulting  services for the  a two-level subterranean semi-automated puzzle shift parking system developed by CityLift.

“Every developer in LA knows if you can’t park it, you can’t build it,” Markwood Development Director Simon M. Aftalion said. “This enables us to pack in the density in a responsible way. Otherwise we wouldn’t be able to house this many units because we wouldn’t be able to park them.”

Multifamily developments in Los Angeles are required to have two parking spaces for each two-bedroom unit, one and a half spaces for one-bedroom units and one space for studios. But the innovative system by Oakland-based CityLift could start a trend in the city’s multifamily landscape that allows developers to build more density with less space, Aftalion said.

Dunsmuir Row, 1233 South Dunsmuir in mid-Wilshire will offer 18 parking spots, while the project, Elmwood Row, on 4807 Elmwood Ave. in Larchmont will have 16 parking spaces.

Read Urbanize Los Angeles Article.

The puzzle shift — sometimes referred to as a puzzle lift — system appears as a stacked four-by-two grid. When a resident parks in a reserved spot, the system shifts or slides the vehicle or lifts it into place. The cars can be accessed independently. It takes an average of 30 seconds for a resident to retrieve a vehicle.     Read the entire article on Bisnow.com.

Courtesy of CityLift – A CityLift puzzle shift parking system

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Angeles was an oil town

Los Angeles Oil Drills Give Way to Skyline Views

(from Urbanize.LA)

One can also say that LA oil drills gave way to new skyline views as well as the birth of environmental engineering.

Long before becoming the epicenter for the film industry, Los Angeles was an oil town. Though few remnants remain today, a large oil field once cut a broad swath through the heart of Los Angeles, running from just south of present-day Dodger Stadium to Vermont Avenue in what is now Koreatown.  It began large-scale operations in the early 1890s, before peaking at the turn of the 20th century and falling into decline as development encroached into its territory over ensuing decades.

The photo (above) from the USC Digital Archive was taken near the intersection of Edgeware Road and Court Street in the first decade of the 1900s.  It depicts oil production in the Westlake area near the era’s peak.  Note the small home at 1274 Court Street at the terminus of Edgeware.  The after image below, taken in 2018 by Laurie Avocado, shows this same view in a modern context.  Gone are the abundance of oil drills, replaced by the skyscrapers of Downtown Los Angeles.  The lone remnant of the century-old image is that same house at 1274 Court Street.

Terra-Petra leades Underground Storage Tank removal

Terra-Petra leads another successful underground storage tank (UST) removal

Terra-Petra was recently contracted to consult and remove 5 underground storage tanks (UST) and one hydraulic lift on a site in Lynwood, California.  These tanks have been left dormant for many years on an old gas station that is not currently operating.  Each tank contained a limited amount of liquid, which requires special permitting, special pumping treatment, and special handing and distribution.  The tanks are a variety of sizes, ranging from 100 gallons to 500 gallons, and located a depths ranging from 10 feet below surface to 20 feet below surface.

Underground storage tanks (USTs) are considered abandoned when regulated substances are no longer stored within those USTs and/or when monitoring requirements of the Operating Permit, Title 23 of California Code or Regulations, and California Health and Safety Code 25298 are not being implemented. Various risks can arise from abandoned USTs when they are not properly closed in place such as the possibility of leaked hazardous substances and contamination to the environment. Therefore it is important that sites with (possible) presence of abandoned USTs be addressed in order to avoid the consequences.

The permitting process through LAFD went very smoothly and efficiently (Terra-Petra has a great relationship with the agency).  The process, from start to finish, took approximately 5-working days, including the required onsite soil testing as the tanks are physically removed.

Check out the photos taken on the jobsite here:

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